A TROPICAL SYSTEM THAT WON’T QUIT

30 July 2010

   Around 28/29 July 2010 an cell of low pressure generating intense rain and storms developed off the east coast of Florida some 150 miles from St. Augustine. While this weather system initially showed little movement it eventually starting moving toward the west by southwest. In early August the system came onshore over Florida moving toward the southwest while generating intense rain over central Florida and eventually South Florida.

The system then moved into the Florida straits and began affecting Cuba and the Florida keys to then turn north by northwest as it moved into the warmer waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The system became tropical depression #5 of the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane season some 100 miles to the west of Naples and then picked up speed aiming for the Luisiana coast.  Tropical depression #5 was downgraded to a low-pressure system before making landfall while it affected the oil-spill cleanup/rescue operations in the Gulf.

7 August 2010
9 August 2010
12 August 2010

 After the system came onshore in Luisiana on 11/12 August, generating plenty of rain and storms, and as it continue moving inland it was expected to weaken and eventually dissipate. Hpwever quite the contraty has happened, the system was fueled by other systems in the area, it has strengthened, and it began to be pushed back south toward the super-warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico until earlier today 15 August 2010 ir has emerged back over the Gulf off the coast of Alabama with plenty of rain and storms. As it continues to move southward farther over the Gulf warm waters the system is strengthening and encountering an environment that may favor further development and event tropical cyclone formation within the next 24 – 48 hours.  The NOAA Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center were giving this system a 30% chance of tropical cyclone formation within the next 48 hours as of 16 August 2010 at 2:00 P.M. EST. 

Tropical Outlook 15 August 2010 at 2:00 P.M. EST