OUR TROPICS: Something is stirring!

Tropical Depression #4 in the eastern East Pacific, off the Pacific coast of Mexico and a couple of low pressure systems, one just 370 km (230 miles) east of Jacksonville, Florida are signs that something may be ‘afoot’ in our neck-of-the-woods.

Infrared color-enhanced GOES WEST satellite image (NOAA) on 29 June 2014 showing a tropical depression chased by a low pressure system over the eastern east Pacific off the coast of Mexico
Infrared color-enhanced GOES WEST satellite image (NOAA) on 29 June 2014 showing a tropical depression chased by a low pressure system over the eastern east Pacific off the coast of Mexico

TD #4 is near Acapulco, Mexico in the same region that has recently generated other tropical activity during the 2014 East Pacific Hurricane Season, which officially activated  on 15 May 2014. The system which is moving generally WNW at 26 kph (16 mph) is being ‘chased’ by a large low pressure cell near the coast that may be showing some cyclonic tendencies. While both these east Pacific storms are moving away fro the mainland, vast amounts of rain and potential flooding is possible along the coastal region in central/southern Mexico.

Color-enhanced infrared GOES EAST satellite image (NOAA) from 29 June 2014 showing a low-pressure system tracking parallel to Florida's east coast
Color-enhanced infrared GOES EAST satellite image (NOAA) from 29 June 2014 showing a low-pressure system tracking parallel to Florida’s east coast

Closer to us, here in Florida, there is a low pressure system some 370 km (230 miles) east of Jacksonville that is moving generally southward paralleling the coastline. This system is tracking in a favorable ocean-atmosphere environment and showing some potential for cyclonic development in the course of the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is investigating this system.

Composite infrared full-disc satellite image (NASA) showing Earth's western hemisphere on 29 June 2014
Composite infrared full-disc satellite image (NASA) showing Earth’s western hemisphere on 29 June 2014

Zooming out to look at the larger North Atlantic basin and parts of the Pacific we can see the outline of the ‘belt of tropical activity’ gradually getting more defined and gradually shifting northward. It is clear we must monitor all of these systems closely, while remaining prepared and alert. Practice MITIGATION!

One thought on “OUR TROPICS: Something is stirring!”

  1. Tropical Depression #4 is now TROPICAL STORM DOUGLAS, the fourth named tropical cyclone of the East Pacific 2014 Hurricane Season that ‘opened’ on 15 May 2014. This storm continues to be ‘chased’ by another tropical disturbance off the Pacific coast of Mexico, which warrant monitoring for potential further development over the next couple of days.

    The low pressure system off the east coast of Florida continues to move generally southward paralleling the coastline while generating rains and thunderstorms over central and south Florida. System appears to be slowly strengthening, and it is given a 60% chance of cyclonic development by the NHC.
    All interest in central and south Florida must monitor this one closely over the next 24-36 hours.