Tag Archives: Hurricane

Cristobal heads north!

Pushed by a strong front moving across the Southeast tropical storm Cristobal made a turn toward the north earlier today, over the southeastern Bahamas.  The new forecast track for Cristobal  will keep the cyclone farther away from the  U.S.A. coastline than initially estimated taking it closer to Bermuda.

Updated track for tropical storm Cristobal as of 24 August 2014 at 1400 (courtesy of the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data)
Updated track for tropical storm Cristobal as of 24 August 2014 at 1400 (courtesy of the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data)

Despite its interaction with the front tropical  storm Cristobal will encounter conditions favoring further strengthening in the next couple of days as it begins to gradually turn toward the north-northeast and eventually the northeast, so there is a possibility that Cristobal may reach hurricane strength after all.

While the forecast track may keep Cristobal away from the U.S.A. mainland, all interest in Florida and the Atlantic seaboard must remain alert and be prepared for potential impacts along the coastal region.

Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 24 August 2014 at 1700 showing Tropical Storm CRISTOBAL and a couple of tropical waves over 'hurricane alley'
Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 24 August 2014 at 1700 showing Tropical Storm CRISTOBAL and a couple of tropical waves over ‘hurricane alley’

There is additional potential for cyclonic activity over the Atlantic basin as we look eastward to a couple of tropical waves now riding ‘hurricane alley’, which we should monitor over the next few days.

Slow as the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season has been so far, and may continue to be, it is critically important to keep in mind  that all it takes is one hit by a hurricane, regardless of its ultimate intensity, to inflict plenty of damage, possible death and injury, and human suffering.

Pay attention, be prepared! MITIGATE!

EASTERN EAST PACIFIC NUMBER 2 IN-THE-MAKING?

A few days ago when reporting on the first-named tropical cyclone of the 2014 East Pacific Hurricane Season, Hurricane AMANDA, we also noticed a large region of disturbed weather ‘chasing’ Amanda off the Pacific coastline from southern Mexico, to Central America and Panama, which was populated by several cells of stormy and disturbed weather.

NOAA satellite imagery on 31 May 2014 shows several disturbed weather cells off the Pacific coastline of Mexico, Central America and Panama
NOAA satellite imagery on 31 May 2014 shows several disturbed weather cells off the Pacific coastline of Mexico, Central America and Panama

As of Friday 30 May 2014 one of those stormy weather cells near the Gulf of Tehuantepec, in southern Mexico, has gotten quiet organized and it is showing signs of potential cyclonic development to the point that the National Hurricane Center (NHC) is giving it a moderate 30% of tropical cyclone development over the next 24 – 36 hours as it continues moving into a favorable atmospheric-oceanic environment.

A zoom-in of NOAA satellite imagery of 31 May 2014 shows an area of low pressure off the Pacific coast of southern Mexico that is showing some signs of potential cyclonic development, which is being monitored by the NHC
A zoom-in of NOAA satellite imagery of 31 May 2014 shows an area of low pressure off the Pacific coast of southern Mexico that is showing some signs of potential cyclonic development, which is being monitored by the NHC

Could this be the genesis of the number two named storm of the 2014 East Pacific hurricane season?  Both NOAA and NASA satellite imagery on  31 May 2014 certainly show an active region of disturbed weather off the Pacific coastline of Mexico, Central America and Panama that warrants close monitoring over the next couple of days.