Tag Archives: Indian Ocean

Snapshots of Earth on 5 September 2015

While many prepare to enjoy the Labor Day weekend here in the United States the issue of weather becomes critical for plans being made. Will the weather allows us to have a picnic in the park, or to spend time at the beach with friends and family?

Speaking of weather, this morning I would like to share  several images of Earth, in full-disk view, from space to give us  an idea of what is happening weather-wise around the world, with particular attention to ‘tropical weather’ and cyclonic activity.

Full disk Earth image of 09/05/2015 over the Americas showing the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans
Full disk Earth image of 09/05/2015 over the Americas showing the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans

In these snapshots we see plenty of tropical cyclone activity including Tropical Storm FRED in the middle of the Atlantic starting to turn toward the Azores being chased by a tropical wave, which is showing some signs of potential further development to the south of the Cape Verde Islands.

Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over the eastern and central Pacific showing plenty of cyclonic activity there
Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over the eastern and central Pacific showing plenty of cyclonic activity there
Full Earth disk image on 09/05/2015 from the central to the western Pacific
Full Earth disk image on 09/05/2015 from the central to the western Pacific

Over the Pacific we see plenty of activity from the eastern Pacific sub-basin to the Central and Northwestern Pacific in the form of hurricane JIMENA east of Hawaii, typhoon KILO to  the west of Hawaii, the remnants of hurricane IGNACIO to the northwest of Hawaii, and tropical storm KEVIN just of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico.

Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over the Indian Ocean where many of the seeds that become tropical waves over equatorial Africa usually form
Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over the Indian Ocean where many of the seeds that become tropical waves over equatorial Africa usually form

Noticeable in these images is the ‘belt of tropical cyclonic activity’ extending from eastern Africa through the Atlantic and the Pacific, all the way to the Indian Ocean over the Bay of Bengal and beyond to the west of India, almost encircling the whole Earth. This a sign there are plenty of seeds that could generate additional tropical cyclones activity in days to come.

Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over Africa and the eastern Atlantic, completing our  full circle around our planet
Full disk image of Earth on 09/05/2015 over Africa and the eastern Atlantic, completing our full circle around our planet

Could it be Carlos in the Eastern Pacific?

Tropical cyclone BLANCA, the second named storm of the 2015 Eastern Pacific hurricane season just went over the Baja California Peninsula of Mexico  in the past couple of days. Following close behind Blanca, we have been monitoring a large cell of disturbed weather and low pressure off the coast of Central America, which appears to be getting better organized showing signs of potential cyclonic development.

Infrared GOES EAST satellite image [NOAA} of 10 June 2015 showing a large cell of disturbed weather in the eastern Pacific sub-basin, which may be developing potential cyclonic activity and could become CARLOS, the 3rd named storm of the Eastern Pacific 2015 hurricane season
Infrared GOES EAST satellite image [NOAA} of 10 June 2015 showing a large cell of disturbed weather in the eastern Pacific sub-basin, which may be developing potential cyclonic activity and could become CARLOS, the 3rd named storm of the Eastern Pacific 2015 hurricane season
Could this be CARLOS, the 3rd named tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific sub-basin or just another wave of bad weather in a region that has shown a propensity for stormy weather over the past few years? Only time will tell, but for now all interests along the Pacific coastal region of Central America and Mexico, from Nicaragua to Baja California will do well to remain alert, be prepared and follow the progress of this system closely over the next couple of days.

Infrared METEOSAT-7 image of 10 June showing Tropical Storm ASHOBAA over the Arabian Sea, northwestern Indian Ocean, approaching landfall in the Arabian Peninsula
Infrared METEOSAT-7 image of 10 June showing Tropical Storm ASHOBAA over the Arabian Sea, northwestern Indian Ocean, approaching landfall in the Arabian Peninsula

Elsewhere in the world there is Tropical Storm ASHOBAA in the Arabian Sea, northwestern Indian Ocean, about to make landfall in the Arabian Peninsula with  sustained maximum winds around 45 – 50 kph.

Projected track of Tropical Storm ASHOBAA (courtesy of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory)
Projected track of Tropical Storm ASHOBAA (courtesy of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory)

Also, the ‘tropical wave assembly line’ over Equatorial Africa is showing signs of continuous activity evidenced by a train of disturbed weather cells crossing the continent and moving generally westward all the way across ‘hurricane alley’ over the northern regions of South America into the eastern Pacific where the potential seed for Carlos is now active.

Composite Full Earth Disk satellite image over the Atlantic showing tropical wave activity over Equatorial Africa and 'hurricane alley' across the Atlantic feeding into the Eastern Pacific sub-basin pn 10 June 2015
Composite Full Earth Disk satellite image over the Atlantic showing tropical wave activity over Equatorial Africa and ‘hurricane alley’ across the Atlantic feeding into the Eastern Pacific sub-basin pn 10 June 2015