Tag Archives: Mitigate

HURRICANE ARTHUR IS NUMBER ONE!

It started as a system  of low pressure  off the coast of Georgia and Northern Florida just a few days ago. This disturbance then started tracking SSE slowly veering south and then southwest aiming for central and southern Florida while generating plenty of rain and thunderstorms over most of Florida.

The system became a tropical depression as it did a 180 and began tracking northward as it reached tropical storm strength, to eventually become Hurricane ARTHUR, the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Visible light satellite image of Hurricane ARTHUR in the morning hours of 4 July 2014 as it progressed off the coast of Virginia mowing toward the NE
Visible light satellite image of Hurricane ARTHUR in the morning hours of 4 July 2014 as it progressed off the coast of Virginia mowing toward the NE

While we have had some cyclonic activity  generated in this region in recent years I can’t recall a hurricane forming where this one did, but I haven’t gone back to check the historical record going back to 1851. I will do so and report back.

Past and projected track for Hurricane ARTHUR developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data
Past and projected track for Hurricane ARTHUR  developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA  data

 All interests along the USA Atlantic seaboard all the way up to the northeastern USA, including those area still undergoing post-Sandy recovery work,  need to be alert and prepared, and monitor this one closely.

Remain alert. Be prepared. MITIGATE!

UPDATE AS OF 1530 07/04/2014

Infrared satellite view (NASA) of Hurricane ARTHUR at 1530 on 07042014
Infrared satellite view (NASA) of Hurricane ARTHUR at 1530 on 07042014

Hurricane ARTHUR still a category 1 tropical cyclone is some 240 km east of Long Island, NY tracking NE at a rather quick 40 kph (24 mph). Because of its rotation storm surge should no create too much of a hazard for the coastal regions of NY and NJ, and beyond. The forecast calls for most of rain impact to be over the Canadian provinces.

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OUR TROPICS: Something is stirring!

Tropical Depression #4 in the eastern East Pacific, off the Pacific coast of Mexico and a couple of low pressure systems, one just 370 km (230 miles) east of Jacksonville, Florida are signs that something may be ‘afoot’ in our neck-of-the-woods.

Infrared color-enhanced GOES WEST satellite image (NOAA) on 29 June 2014 showing a tropical depression chased by a low pressure system over the eastern east Pacific off the coast of Mexico
Infrared color-enhanced GOES WEST satellite image (NOAA) on 29 June 2014 showing a tropical depression chased by a low pressure system over the eastern east Pacific off the coast of Mexico

TD #4 is near Acapulco, Mexico in the same region that has recently generated other tropical activity during the 2014 East Pacific Hurricane Season, which officially activated  on 15 May 2014. The system which is moving generally WNW at 26 kph (16 mph) is being ‘chased’ by a large low pressure cell near the coast that may be showing some cyclonic tendencies. While both these east Pacific storms are moving away fro the mainland, vast amounts of rain and potential flooding is possible along the coastal region in central/southern Mexico.

Color-enhanced infrared GOES EAST satellite image (NOAA) from 29 June 2014 showing a low-pressure system tracking parallel to Florida's east coast
Color-enhanced infrared GOES EAST satellite image (NOAA) from 29 June 2014 showing a low-pressure system tracking parallel to Florida’s east coast

Closer to us, here in Florida, there is a low pressure system some 370 km (230 miles) east of Jacksonville that is moving generally southward paralleling the coastline. This system is tracking in a favorable ocean-atmosphere environment and showing some potential for cyclonic development in the course of the next couple of days. The National Hurricane Center is investigating this system.

Composite infrared full-disc satellite image (NASA) showing Earth's western hemisphere on 29 June 2014
Composite infrared full-disc satellite image (NASA) showing Earth’s western hemisphere on 29 June 2014

Zooming out to look at the larger North Atlantic basin and parts of the Pacific we can see the outline of the ‘belt of tropical activity’ gradually getting more defined and gradually shifting northward. It is clear we must monitor all of these systems closely, while remaining prepared and alert. Practice MITIGATION!