Tag Archives: Pacific Ocean. Mexico. Central America

RIGHT ON CUE: Mother Nature activates East Pacific 2014 Hurricane Season!

Just two days ago from this site mitigat.com asked “Does Mother Nature Know: that hurricane seasons are here?”, while pointing out that ‘Tropical depression ONE’ was on the move off the Pacific coast of Mexico.

Satellite view (NOAA) showing category 4 Hurricane AMANDA off the Pacific coast of Mexico on 25 May 2014
Satellite view (NOAA) showing category 4 Hurricane AMANDA off the Pacific coast of Mexico on 25 May 2014

Tropical depression ONE is now an intensifying Category 4 (Saffir- Simpson hurricane wind scale) hurricane AMANDA, the first-named tropical cyclone of the 2014 East Pacific hurricane season, moving generally NW some 1,000 kilometers southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

Projected track of Hurricane AMANDA as of 25 May 2014; by the Naval Research Laboratory based on data from NOAA
Projected track of Hurricane AMANDA as of 25 May 2014; by the Naval Research Laboratory based on data from NOAA

The forecast (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCDEP1+shtml/251458.shtml) calls for AMANDA to intensify some more as it continues to move in a favorable ocean-atmosphere environment, but as its tracks turns gradually toward the NNW and then north progressing  toward a NNE – NE track in the next 48 – 72 hours it will enter  cooler surface waters and also encounter wind shear that will weaken it. Despite this projections, all interests in the Pacific coastal region of Mexico from the Baja California peninsula to Acapulco and points south should monitor this tropical cyclone closely in days to come.

Region populated by disturbed weather cells off the coast of Central America and Panama, in the eastern east Pacific to the southeast of AMANDA's current posiiton on 25 May 2014
Region populated by disturbed weather cells off the coast of Central America and Panama, in the eastern east Pacific to the southeast of AMANDA’s current posiiton on 25 May 2014

Of interest for this region is a large area to the southeast of AMANDA’s  current position reaching to Panama, which is populated by numerous disturbed weather cells and may present some potential for cyclonic development in the wake of AMANDA. Something to be monitored closely  by coastal interests from Mexico to Central America and Panama for sure.

Atlantic basin north of the equator on 25 May 2014. Hurricane Alley is populated by a chain of smaller storm cells moving generally westward.
Atlantic basin north of the equator on 25 May 2014. Hurricane Alley is populated by a chain of smaller storm cells moving generally westward.

Closer to our neck-of-the woods and of interest to coastal residents along the Gulf coast and the eastern USA seaboard, the Atlantic basin north of the equator remains mostly quiet today Sunday, 25 May 2014, but the southern region of ‘Hurricane Alley’ shows a long train of smaller storm cells marching westward while larger tropical waves continue to form over Equatorial Africa. These are certainly signs of the progressively warmer tropics over a region of particular significance to USA interests.

Disturbed weather cells are shown moving over the Philippines Sea on this satellite image of 25 May 2014
Disturbed weather cells are shown moving over the Philippines Sea on this satellite image of 25 May 2014

Elsewhere, several stormy weather cells are approaching the Philippines Sea menacing a region that has seen its share of damaging impacts  in 2013 and previous years. Continuing farther west the Bay of Bengal in the northern Indian Ocean is under a massive storm cell with potential for cyclonic development.

Very large storm cells over the Bay of Bengal in this  satellite image of 25 May 2014
Very large storm cells over the Bay of Bengal in this satellite image of 25 May 2014

These are the signs of the times. The northern tropics are warming up and Mother Nature is starting to stir things up. All interests along tropical and subtropical coastal regions in the northern hemisphere must be alert, remain prepared and engage in the practice of MITIGATION! Keeping in mind that storm surge is much more damaging by far than wind, and that breaking waves riding above the onrushing surge waters also pack significant energy as they impact coastal structures and facilities.