Tag Archives: USA Atlantic seaboard

Cristobal heads north!

Pushed by a strong front moving across the Southeast tropical storm Cristobal made a turn toward the north earlier today, over the southeastern Bahamas.  The new forecast track for Cristobal  will keep the cyclone farther away from the  U.S.A. coastline than initially estimated taking it closer to Bermuda.

Updated track for tropical storm Cristobal as of 24 August 2014 at 1400 (courtesy of the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data)
Updated track for tropical storm Cristobal as of 24 August 2014 at 1400 (courtesy of the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data)

Despite its interaction with the front tropical  storm Cristobal will encounter conditions favoring further strengthening in the next couple of days as it begins to gradually turn toward the north-northeast and eventually the northeast, so there is a possibility that Cristobal may reach hurricane strength after all.

While the forecast track may keep Cristobal away from the U.S.A. mainland, all interest in Florida and the Atlantic seaboard must remain alert and be prepared for potential impacts along the coastal region.

Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 24 August 2014 at 1700 showing Tropical Storm CRISTOBAL and a couple of tropical waves over 'hurricane alley'
Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 24 August 2014 at 1700 showing Tropical Storm CRISTOBAL and a couple of tropical waves over ‘hurricane alley’

There is additional potential for cyclonic activity over the Atlantic basin as we look eastward to a couple of tropical waves now riding ‘hurricane alley’, which we should monitor over the next few days.

Slow as the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season has been so far, and may continue to be, it is critically important to keep in mind  that all it takes is one hit by a hurricane, regardless of its ultimate intensity, to inflict plenty of damage, possible death and injury, and human suffering.

Pay attention, be prepared! MITIGATE!

HURRICANE ARTHUR IS NUMBER ONE!

It started as a system  of low pressure  off the coast of Georgia and Northern Florida just a few days ago. This disturbance then started tracking SSE slowly veering south and then southwest aiming for central and southern Florida while generating plenty of rain and thunderstorms over most of Florida.

The system became a tropical depression as it did a 180 and began tracking northward as it reached tropical storm strength, to eventually become Hurricane ARTHUR, the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

Visible light satellite image of Hurricane ARTHUR in the morning hours of 4 July 2014 as it progressed off the coast of Virginia mowing toward the NE
Visible light satellite image of Hurricane ARTHUR in the morning hours of 4 July 2014 as it progressed off the coast of Virginia mowing toward the NE

While we have had some cyclonic activity  generated in this region in recent years I can’t recall a hurricane forming where this one did, but I haven’t gone back to check the historical record going back to 1851. I will do so and report back.

Past and projected track for Hurricane ARTHUR developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA data
Past and projected track for Hurricane ARTHUR  developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory on the basis of NOAA  data

 All interests along the USA Atlantic seaboard all the way up to the northeastern USA, including those area still undergoing post-Sandy recovery work,  need to be alert and prepared, and monitor this one closely.

Remain alert. Be prepared. MITIGATE!

UPDATE AS OF 1530 07/04/2014

Infrared satellite view (NASA) of Hurricane ARTHUR at 1530 on 07042014
Infrared satellite view (NASA) of Hurricane ARTHUR at 1530 on 07042014

Hurricane ARTHUR still a category 1 tropical cyclone is some 240 km east of Long Island, NY tracking NE at a rather quick 40 kph (24 mph). Because of its rotation storm surge should no create too much of a hazard for the coastal regions of NY and NJ, and beyond. The forecast calls for most of rain impact to be over the Canadian provinces.

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