Tag Archives: Yellow Sea

It is the Philippines…again in 2014!

Based on the historical record the far northwestern Pacific ocean is by far the most active cyclogenesis basin on Earth. Including the Philippines Sea, the South China Sea, the Yellow Sea, and the balance of the northwestern Pacific region consistently generates the largest number of tropical cyclones on an annual basis.

Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 18 September 2014 showing tropical storm FUNG-WONG over the northern Philippines
Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) of 18 September 2014 showing tropical storm FUNG-WONG over the northern Philippines

Smack in the middle of this region sits the archipelago of the Philippines, making it the most hurricane-vulnerable country in the world. Just last week the northern Philippines were hit by typhoon Kalmaegi, and no sooner had affected communities assessed their damage and initiated recovery efforts than a new storm, Fung-Wong began battering much of the same region. Even more worrisome is the large cell of disturbed weather that is currently following in Fung-Wong footsteps aiming in the same general direction of the Philippines.

Projected track for tropical storm Fung-Wong (by the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory based on NOAA data)
Projected track for tropical storm Fung-Wong (by the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory based on NOAA data)

Many will remember super-typhoon Haiyan, named Yolanda by Philippine authorities, which hit dead-on in the middle of the Philippines Islands in November 2013 as the strongest tropical cyclone of record anywhere, causing upward of 6,200 death and more than US$ 3.0 billion in physical damage.

In the past ten years alone, since 2004, the Philippines have sustained at least nine major typhoon hits, which have left more than 15,000 deaths in their wake, and billion of U.S. dollars in damage  In addition this nations had seen many times that number in terms of impacts by weaker storms.  On the average the Philippines are hit by tropical cyclones 6 – 9 times per year, with most of those hits taking place in the northern regions of the country.

A characteristic of tropical cyclones generated in this region, and of those affecting the Philippines, is that they generally are rather “wet storms” meaning that they generated vast amounts of rain. As a result flooding, from flash floods in mountainous terrain, river overtopping their banks, and from storm surge, is a major damaging component and contributor to the death toll.

6 JULY 2014: Typhoon NEOGURI getting stronger!

Infrared satellite image (NASA) of 6 July 2014 showing Typhoon NEOGURI in far northwestern Pacific
Infrared satellite image (NASA) of 6 July 2014 showing Typhoon NEOGURI in far northwestern Pacific

Already a strong category 3 and continuing to strengthen typhoon NEOGURI is churning in the far northwestern Pacific to the SE of Taiwan with maximum sustained winds of 225 kph (~129 mph) gusting to near 270 kph (~169 mph).  The storm system is rather large spanning more than 1000 km in diameter.

Projected track for Typhoon NEOGURI dewveloped by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory based on NOAA data
Projected track for Typhoon NEOGURI developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory based on NOAA data

NEOGURI is tracking NW and expected to turn NNW toward the Yellow Sea and Southwestern Japan.  The typhoon is progressing through a favorable ocean-atmospheric environment that should promote further strengthening with a high probability that NEOGURI may become a super-typhoon (category 5) in the next day or so. All interest in the region, from the northern Philippines, Taiwan, China, to Korea and Japan must monitor this dangerous storm closely.

Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) showing the wider Northwest Pacific basin and Typhoon NEOGURI on 6 July 2014. Notice the clear well defined and rather large eye of the storm
Color-enhanced infrared satellite image (NOAA) showing the wider Northwest Pacific basin and Typhoon NEOGURI on 6 July 2014. Notice the clear well-defined and rather large eye of the storm